Conversations

During each of the six breakout sessions throughout the weekend, a large number of conversations will take place. This site will help you organize your plan for the weekend and provide the relevant information for each conversation. After signing in, search through the conversations below and mark the sessions you are interested in to populate your personal schedule on the right (or below if on your mobile phone).

Learning Through Community Engagement

Session 6
Casey Cohen, Laurie Doran, Dr. Sheri Hanna

We will share projects and courses that utilize the community of Philadelphia to provide unique and challenging learning opportunities for students. Examples from STEM, the arts, and humanities courses will be highlighted. We will focus on the process: reaching out to the community, creating a project, and student commentary and reflection.

Projects in Math Class Revisited

Session 6
Morgan Bushnell, Brad Latimer

SLA has been a project based school since its inception, and we have been developing and revising math projects since 2006. This session will focus on how we develop these projects, how we revise them/create new projects, and what different structures for the projects look like. During the session, students and teachers will present projects that they used in the past, with a focus on the process of project development/revision. There will also be significant time for participants to develop/workshop projects for their own math classes, so please bring an outline for a math project, or a project description that you'd like to revise. By the end of the session, all participants should walk away with a project that they intend to use during an upcoming unit.

TAKING IT BACK- Reclaiming Media Integrity

Session 6
Douglas Herman- Founding Director, Rough Cut Media; Susan Poulton- Chief Digital Officer, The Franklin Institute

Now more than ever our society depends on the development of deep and nuanced relationships with media. In an era of deliberately misleading news, false narratives and an utter lack of social media responsibility, it feels imperative that we prepare our students for what comes next. Yet, in many ways it is the other way around with our students having more savvy and versatility when it comes to interactions with media from multiple sources. Regardless of where we receive our information we still must ask ourselves "Who made this?" "Who paid for it?, "Who does it target?", "How will this impact the public?", "Who benefits from widespread consumption and belief?" We also have to consider new ways, or perhaps reapply tried and true standards, to media discourse both online and in print media.

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